My First Double Dactyls

In the past, I have posted about double dactyls here and here. In 1966, or 1967, When Hecht and Hollander published their book of Double Dactyls, Esquire magazine held a competition where readers could submit their own double dactyls.   I wrote the three that follow, but I didn't have the courage to submit them. Jiggery-Pokery!…

Read More
More on the Influence of Form

Not long ago, I posted about the influence that poetic form has on the effect of a poem.   At that time I said that I intended to do further experiments with translation of a poem from one form to another.   Here is my next attempt. The starting point is a light verse I posted almost…

Read More
A is For Arnyx

It occurred to me that although I have posted a sample illustration from my book of verse for children, A is for Arnyx, I haven't posted any examples of the verses themselves.   Here are three of them,   The first, The Arnyx,  was also the first to be written.  I made up the name "Arnyx" and…

Read More
Variation on a Theme by Baudelaire

The following variation was written a few years later than the Variations I describe  here.   The theme it varies is from the "To the Reader" introduction to Les Fleurs du Mal, or rather from my translation of "To the Reader,"  which I may share at some point.   It’s true, my friend, you have free…

Read More
Peace March

In 1969, I was working for System Development Corporation in Santa Monica, in the job I wound up in after I was almost sent to Vietnam.   (I'll write about that and about the complicated mix on anti-war revulsion and sense of duty that I felt at the time in conjunction with a forthcoming poem).  1969…

Read More
Dealing with Death

I just reviewed this site...no  less than six posted poems since January  have to do in some way with death, which is strange, because as I grow older, and as I experience the deaths of others close to me, death has become a part of life.   But when I was young, I was haunted by…

Read More
To The Fair

Here I go again.   I said here that I didn't write songs, and yet here is yet another verse turned into a song, this one from the early 70's. Intro: My mother made me take you out She said that you were very sad, Because your mother and your dad Had perished in a roundabout.…

Read More
On the Decline of Light Verse

As I have indicated here , I grew up in a household that loved verse.   My mother was an actress, who appreciated recitations.   My father was a college professor turned rocket scientist who loved to recite.   I grew up with W S Gilbert, and Lewis Carroll and Ogden Nash.   In those days,…

Read More
Another Song

Recently, I posted this, which I said was the only true song I ever wrote.   That's no longer true.  A refrain from a Dylan-inspired verse I wrote back in 1968 began to percolate in my brain, and it has just expanded into my second song. Fortune Smiles on a Motherless Child Intro(1): Well, Life,…

Read More
A Topical Clerihew

I've been struggling lately to write the introductions to a set of more serious poems.  I'll get there, but meanwhile, a brief excursion.  President Obama has been showing a hint of passion lately, but for most of his two terms in office, the following clerihew applied: Barack Obama Avoided drama. When Republicans began to whine,…

Read More

A blog about all the arts, including politics
"for 'twere absurd to think that nature in the earth bred gold, perfect in the instant;
there must be remote matter." - Ben Jonson
"I don't know what the question is, but art is the answer." - Guy Conner

linkedin facebook pinterest youtube rss twitter instagram facebook-blank rss-blank linkedin-blank pinterest youtube twitter instagram